These 4 Words Can Help You

Networking, Connections, Mentors, Inspiration

These are some of my favorite words––words that I use a lot. What makes these four words so important is that they are linked––well, at least I consider them linked. For instance: when you are “networking”, often times you are building new “connections”. These new bonds, over time, could lead to one of your connections becoming more of a “mentor” in your life who might support and give you some “inspiration”. Some people use their networking abilities to meet more like-minded individuals who are following down a similar path. They use their connections to opens doors for themselves both in business and in life.

But a word of caution: Don’t just take, take, take from your network, connections and mentors. If you finally get to that fourth word and find “inspiration”, and you owe some of it to the people in your network, you need to flip the script and learn to give back. Become a mentor yourself, and inspire a whole new generation. Be that connector in your group. This is when life really gets interesting.

4 words, inspiration, networking, connections, mentors

Instant Connections: On the Nook

Today was the first day that I actually saw my book Instant Connections on a Nook. I knew it was available on it, but I had never seen it with my own two eyes. Thanks Barnes & Noble for not yelling at me for taking a picture of it in your store. (Yes, they actually chastised me in front of my 9-year old niece for trying to take a picture in their store last month…….we won’t get into that here.  I’m all about happy thoughts.) P.S…….supposedly it’s a rule that you are not allowed to take photographs in their stores.

instant connections, jason landry, book, author, writer, nook

Instant Connections: The Photos

I love it when people send me photographs that they took with my book Instant Connections. I am very honored that you are reading it, and in one case, destroying it. Take a picture with the book this summer and send it to me. I’m sure you can find me via email or any of the number of social media sites I’m on.

instant connections, jason landry, author, writer, book, photography

Food for Thought: Practice Makes Perfect

Remember the saying, “Practice Makes Perfect?” It is very important to practice whatever craft you want to master. It might not just be the 10,000 hours that Malcolm Gladwell describes in his book Outliers and they discuss in this article.

The last sentence of the article asks, “the important question now is, what else matters?” The fact is, besides practice, you need a solid network and connections. People who will talk about you, confirm your abilities, and help strengthen your brand. Without those so called “Influencers” or “Validators” in your corner, you could be the best at whatever you do, but never be recognized for it.

Read more of this article at Business Insider, or by clicking on the image below.

business insider, malcolm gladwell

Ask The Author on GoodReads

goodreads, jason landry, author, writer, instant connections, ask the author

GoodReads has this great new section called, Ask The Author.  You can submit questions to any of your favorite authors if they have set up accounts on GoodReads. So, with that said, I will be taking questions all summer long about my book Instant Connections: Essays and Interviews on Photography.  Just visit their site and post a question. I will answer questions directly related to the book, but also questions on photography, running a gallery, being a collector, networking, building connections, your art brand, and mentors.

Summer Reading List

tim horvath, understories, book, author, writerWell, summer is right around the corner for us New Englanders. The warmer weather gets us outdoors into the parks, onto our brownstone stoops, and to the beaches. Hopefully, if you’re like me, you’ll be bringing a book with you.

Two years ago when I was knee-deep in writing Instant Connections, I was reading a lot of non-fiction books: Anthony Bourdain’s Kitchen Confidential, Tina Fey’s Bossypants, Jenny Lawson’s Let’s Pretend This Never Happened, just to name a few.

This year, as I just started a new challenge––writing a historical fiction book, I’ve been reading and re-reading books in that genre to learn more about how authors tackle plot lines and building interesting and dynamic characters.

So, yeah, I’ve tackled all of Dan Brown’s books. They are easy to read and he tells a good story. William Martin is another favorite of mine. In the last year I have read his books Back Bay, The Lincoln Letter, and most recently Harvard Yard. His approach to writing gets you reading in the present day, in one chapter, and then in the next, you are reading about something that happened back in time.  The story volleys back and forth like this throughout the book.

As for me, I have finished some of the research for my new book and have about 10% of the writing started. For a historical fiction book, most average between 90-120,000 words, so I’ve got a ways to go.

In between my writing this summer, I have added these six books to my Summer Reading List:

The Ocean at The End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman.
Tinkers by Paul Harding
Understories by Tim Horvath
Moonwalking with Einstein by Joshua Foer
REMOTE by Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson
My Life in Heavy Metal by Steve Almond

The first two I’ve had on my shelf for a while, the third book is by a colleague of mine, the forth book I’ve started but need to pick back up, the fifth book I bought and will read because I liked their first book REWORK, and the last book I have also started but need to finish.

What are you reading?

A Game of Baseball

boston red sox, red sox, baseball, stephen sheffield, game of baseball

Red Sox montage by Stephen Sheffield

It’s a full count––three balls, two strikes. You try to remember everything your father told you: “Keep your eyes on the ball. Check your stance. Set your feet. Bend your knees. Get the bat off of your shoulder.” This stuff wasn’t too hard to remember since my dad regularly umpired my Little League games.

The bat was now cocked and ready to connect. It’s a fastball. You swing with all your might. At the crack of the bat, a deep fly ball goes to left field and over the fence. Home run!

That’s how it always happened in my dreams anyway. I never got to hit a home run in real life. If life were like a game of baseball, you would hope for a home run scenario every time. But in reality, there are some curveballs, knuckleballs, change-ups and quite possibly some spitballs thrown into the mix to make things more challenging. But challenges are part of the game, regardless of whether you’re playing t-ball, Little League, or the Majors. Challenges can also take you off-course, but don’t let them. They’re usually building blocks for something greater––something too fast to see when they’re coming at you at ninety miles an hour.

A Game of Baseball, from the book,
Instant Connections: Essays and Interviews on Photography by Jason Landry.